What’s the deal?

Despite the fact that it’s 2014 and you can shave your legs with lasers, the average working woman still makes only 78 cents to a man’s dollar.1

Over the course of a career, that’s $435,049 lost to the wage gap.

With nearly 69 million women in the workplace,2 that’s a total loss of as much as 30 TRILLION FRICKIN DOLLARS.

Clearly, the policies in place don’t go far enough. It’s time we won the battle we’ve been fighting for fifty years. It’s time we enlisted the Internet.

Ladies, we’re crowdfunding the wage gap.

Cool, but where does the money actually go?

We’re not asking women to literally pay themselves back. That would be silly. Instead, the money raised goes to the National Women’s Law Center, a non-profit group fighting for equal pay through legislation, education and advocacy.

Your donations give NWLC the support it needs to end the insanity. From getting the Paycheck Fairness Act back on the Senate floor, to keeping pregnant women from being forced off the job, to putting an end to ridiculous scheduling practices.


Funding NWLC is our best bet for making equal pay a reality.

OK. How much should I give?

If we raise…

Some stuff you should know:
 
The wage gap exists across almost every occupation3:

In conclusion, this sh** is cray.

What the FAQ?

A campaign created for and benefitting

Made possible by

Special thanks to

The National Women’s Law Center is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization. All donations are tax-deductible.

* We’re not asking women to literally pay themselves back. And of course we don’t expect to raise $29 trillion. Instead, the money goes to the National Women’s Law Center and will be used to fight for equal pay through legislation, education and advocacy.

  1. NWLC analysis of US Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (CPS) 2014 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), available at
    http://www.nwlc.org/nwlc-analysis-2013-census-poverty-data. Figures compare median annual earnings for female and male full time, year round workers.
  2. Figure is number of women 16 and older employed in August, 2014 per Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey (last visited Sept. 23, 2014)
    http://www.bls.gov/web/empsit/cpseea03.htm.
  3. Figures are median weekly earnings for full-time wage and salary workers for 2013 from US Bureau of Labor Statistics, available at http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat39.pdf.
  4. Figures are median weekly earnings for full-time wage and salary workers (for occupation overall) for 2013 from US Bureau of Labor Statistics, available at http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat39.pdf. Figures for share of women in the occupation are 2013 annual averages from US Bureau of Labor Statistics, available at http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat11.pdf.
  5. NWLC analysis of US Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (CPS) 2014 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), available at http://www.nwlc.org/nwlc-analysis-2013-census-poverty-data. Figures compare median annual earnings for female and male full time, year round workers.
  6. NWLC calculations based on CPS, 2013 ASEC using Miriam King et al, “IPUMS, Current Population Survey: Version 3.0)”, available at https://cps.ipums.org/cps/index.shtml. Mothers and fathers have at least one related child under 18 at home. Figures are median annual earnings for full time, year round workers in 2012.
  7. Jennifer Cheeseman Day & Jeffrey Rosenthal, US Census Bureau, Detailed Occupations and Median Earnings: 2008, available at http://www.census.gov/people/io/files/acs08_detailedoccupations.pdf.
  8. Figures based on 2010 data from Institute for Women’s Policy Research, available at http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/pay-secrecy-and-wage-discrimination.
  9. NWLC analysis of US Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (CPS) 2014 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), available at http://www.nwlc.org/nwlc-analysis-2013-census-poverty-data. Figures compare median annual earnings for female and male full time, year round workers.
  10. NWLC analysis of US Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (CPS) 2014 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), available at http://www.nwlc.org/nwlc-analysis-2013-census-poverty-data. Figures compare median annual earnings for female and male full time, year round workers.
  11. Philip Cohen, The Persistence of Workplace Gender Segregation in the US, Sociology Compass (2013) 889-899, available at: http://www.terpconnect.umd.edu/~pnc/SocComp2013.pdf
  12. Study available at http://gender.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/motherhoodpenalty.pdf.
  13. NWLC analysis of US Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (CPS) 2014 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), available at http://www.nwlc.org/nwlc-analysis-2013-census-poverty-data. Figures compare median annual earnings for female and male full time, year round workers.
  14. Center for American Progress, Sarah Jane Glynn, “Breadwinning Mothers, Then and Now”, available at http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/labor/report/2014/06/20/92355/breadwinning-mothers-then-and-now/.